Love One Another

Posted: May 2, 2018 in Blog, Pastor's Corner
Tags: , , , ,

Love to one another, and for one another is important. It’s intuitive, right? If I were to write a manual on this subject it might be titled ‘Love for Dummies’.  But that title has already been taken. Under this title is a highly secularized picture of love. The title itself implies that this is an easy matter, and dummies need it spelled out for them through the lowest common denominator.

Love one another, easy enough, right? And if others don’t get it, just say it louder!

Let it suffice to say, love really isn’t that easy. It is a matter that takes a lifetime to figure out, and the power of Jesus to function within. For the Christian the call to love each other is so common, if not altogether cliche, that it really isn’t heard.

In the Gospel of Matthew we see that this call extends beyond affection for those whom we are in fellowship with, or even those whom we find highly important. In Matthew 18:10–14, an exhortation on the love for souls is given, “See that you do not despise one of these little ones. For I tell you that in heaven their angels always see the face of my Father who is in heaven. What do you think? If a man has a hundred sheep, and one of them has gone astray, does he not leave the ninety-nine on the mountains and go in search of the one that went astray? And if he finds it, truly, I say to you, he rejoices over it more than over the ninety-nine that never went astray. So it is not the will of my Father who is in heaven that one of these little ones should perish.”  

Here we read a command to value those considered unimportant. Functionally it is call to love. It might be skewed by some as children are almost deified in our society, and agricultural precepts are lost on most. Here is a command to pursue those who are lesser or obstinately off on their own and not worth the time.

In other cultures, and in particularly the historic context of the passage, children are regarded as less than. And stray sheep are regarded as an inconvenient matter that is handled according to economic measures. Jesus paints a picture with children and the singular sheep, as the lesser, and how they are not to be despised, but regarded as highly important. 

This example points to something greater than simply treating children well, or keeping the herd gathered. Rather it presses the hearer to consider the souls of others, even those of lesser value, as greatly important. Even within religious people there is a utilitarian tendency to cast aside those who are down trodden and unimportant, especially those who are burdensome. 

Don’t get me wrong, the church does many great things, we give many great things in an effort to love those in need, but the lack of love in the world would demand that Christians consider how we might fill that void. It has often been stated that Christians shoot the weak or wounded, rather than love those who are inconvenient. Kids are inconvenient, and so is a lost sheep, as are many people God places directly in our paths. Do we really regard the weak and wounded as too much of a burden? Do we really have a want of love for the souls of mankind?

I don’t think the church is as bad, or as good as some would frame it. Many regard others to be less than and insignificant. This is a heart matter that Christians must deal with. Remember Jesus came to seek and save that which is lost, to love the souls of men, and seek to keep them from perishing through the message of the cross. By God’s grace we are invited to do the same.

How do you love the souls of men? Do you despise the little ones? Do you seek after the one, rejoice over the one? Take the time this week to think about your want of love for the souls of others. 

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